The next revolution is green

Life Science – inspired by nature

Life Science

Currently, a transformation is taking place in the industry that was predicted as the "bio-based revolution" years ago. Nature and life sciences are not only inspiring the development of new materials and structures. More and more, biological processes are being integrated into manufacturing processes and products, too.

Driven by advances in biotechnology (e.g. precision fermentation) and consumer preferences, production processes and product requirements are changing in traditional life science areas. This transformation is supported by rapid advances in digitalization along the entire value chain.

Accordingly, Schlegel und Partner supports you in shaping your innovation and growth strategy.

Contact person
Dr. Thorsten Böhn
Partner, Director Life Science
+49 6201 9915 79
Contact person
Dr. Isabelle Symonds
Director Life Science
+49 6201 9915 10

Agricultural input

  • Energy, chemicals (incl. fertilizers, crop protection), water, biological materials, agricultural machinery, consumables

Agricultural businesses: crop production

  • Cultivation methods, stress resistance (water, UV, heat, cold, drought), data driven insights, exotic plants

Agricultural businesses: animal husbandry

  • Animal health, antibiotics reduction, digital livestock, in-time animal health, stable hygiene

Farmfree production and bioreactors

  • Synthetic milk, meat from the lab, lab grown flour, biologically produced odors and flavors, food ingredients

Input into the food industry

  • Food machinery, technical consumables, auxiliaries, ingredients

Food processing

  • Proteins, fat and sugar reduction, shelf life, contamination prevention, food safety

Food consumption / consumers

  • Clean eating, healthy food and health claims, transparency and traceability, infant feeding, clinical and medical nutrition, personalized nutrition

Concepts and systems across the entire value chain

  • Transparency and safety, data driven insights, food waste reduction

Value Chain

  • Agricultural input
  • Agricultural businesses: crop production
  • Agricultural businesses: animal husbandry
  • Farmfree production and bioreactors
  • Input into the food industry
  • Food processing
  • Food consumption / consumers
  • Concepts and systems across the entire value chain

Value Chain

  • Agricultural input
    • Energy, chemicals (incl. fertilizers, crop protection), water, biological materials, agricultural machinery, consumables
  • Agricultural businesses: crop production
    • Cultivation methods, stress resistance (water, UV, heat, cold, drought), data driven insights, exotic plants
  • Agricultural businesses: animal husbandry
    • Animal health, antibiotics reduction, digital livestock, in-time animal health, stable hygiene
  • Farmfree production and bioreactors
    • Synthetic milk, meat from the lab, lab grown flour, biologically produced odors and flavors, food ingredients
  • Input into the food industry
    • Food machinery, technical consumables, auxiliaries, ingredients
  • Food processing
    • Proteins, fat and sugar reduction, shelf life, contamination prevention, food safety
  • Food consumption / consumers
    • Clean eating, healthy food and health claims, transparency and traceability, infant feeding, clinical and medical nutrition, personalized nutrition
  • Concepts and systems across the entire value chain
    • Transparency and safety, data driven insights, food waste reduction

Exemplary studies

  • Global market potential for an innovative plant protein source
  • Growth strategy for a vitamin manufacturer in selected African countries and market segments
  • Global market for enzymes in bakery products and animal feed (aquaculture, swine, poultry and pets)
  • The global market for products to increase fertilizer efficiency and avoid greenhouse gas emissions (e.g. inhibitors, stabilized fertilizers)
  • Technologies in cultured meat and seafood and identification of M&A candidates for a leading industrial group
  • Change of farm-to-fork digital ecosystem (e.g., through New Green Deal) and implications for digital tools for crop nutrition, feed, and farm management
  • Customer needs and willingness to pay for a new antibiotic-free approach to animal health
  • Production technologies and global market for biotechnologically produced oligosaccharides in human nutrition and cosmetics
  • Farmfree strategy for a manufacturer of animal protein specialties and identification of cooperation partners in the food, cosmetics and medical sectors
  • Market opportunities for innovative functional food products with focus on health-promoting effects (e.g. intestinal functions and mental performance)